By continuing to use the site or forum, you agree to the use of cookies, find out more by reading our GDPR policy

If there’s one thing that Microsoft mobile fans want, it’s a phone from Microsoft. Without Windows phones, there are few options. The Galaxy Note 10 and other Samsung flagships are obvious choices for a Microsoft supported mobile in spirit. Yet, the desire is strong for a Microsoft Surface-like experience albeit with Android. It’s an alluring fantasy, but a fantasy nonetheless. Microsoft’s previous mobile efforts have been met with disaster. Windows Mobile failed to take off, Windows Phone/Windows 10 Mobile died in the crib, and Windows RT was similarly unsuccessful. There’s a compelling school of thought that says, why doesn’t Microsoft do what others have. Why not adopt Android? Much like with its Surface Pro line, you’d be pairing powerful hardware with software that people actually want. You’d get Microsoft hardware and software support, along with access to Android and the Google Play Store (and the US government’s unlikely to rip it out of your hands as well post-purchase.) It seems like a no-brainer, but its a lot more complicated than that. For Microsoft to be able to justify this thing (to users and bean counters both), it’s going to have to solve a unique problem that the market isn’t catering to at the moment. Microsoft’s brand alone is not enough to carry sales of a device. No, if Microsoft is releasing such a mobile phone, it would have to do so with a USP. A problem it intends to do solve that’ll draw a niche where it can build off on – else it’s just another Android Phone. One route they could take is the camera. Aside from the reputation of Lumia, Microsoft was making cool camera apps like Blink and Qik even before the Nokia purchase. To learn more visit OUR FORUM.

Relatively new on the ransomware scene, Sodinokibi has already made impressive profits for its administrators and affiliates, some victims paying as much as $240,000, while a network infection netted $150,000 on average. These figures are not surprising when you look at the malware's recent activity. On August 16, Sodinokibi hit 22 local administrations in Texas and demanded a collective ransom of $2.5 million. It compromised multiple MSPs (managed service providers) spreading the malware to their customers. The latest victim is another MSP that offers data backup service to dental practices. The ransom, in this case, is allegedly $5,000 per client; hundreds were impacted. Since its discovery in April, Sodinokibi (a.k.a. REvil) has become prolific and quickly gained a reputation among cybercriminals in the ransomware business and security researchers. In mid-May, a Sodinokibi advertiser using the forum name UNKN deposited over $100,000 on underground forums to show that they meant serious business. Advertisements for the new file-encrypting malware started in early July on at least two forums. UNKN said that they were looking to expand their activity and that it was a private operation with "limited number of seats" available for experienced individuals. A screenshot of the announcement, provided to BleepingComputer by malware researcher Damian shows that UNKN describes the malware as being "private ransomware" flexible enough to adapt to the RaaS business model. The name of the ransomware is not disclosed in the forum posts but the researcher told us that he saw screenshots of the malware's administrative panel showing bot IDs that look the same as those for Sodinokibi. As seen in the screenshot below, one victim paid 27.7 bitcoins, which converted to more than $220,000 at the time of the transaction. Get deeper into this by visiting OUR FORUM.

A new Trojan dropper dubbed xHelper was observed while slowly but steadily spreading to more and more Android devices since May, with over 32,000 smartphones and tablets having been found infected in the last four months. Trojan droppers are tools used by threat actors to deliver other more dangerous malware strains to already compromised devices, including but not limited to clicker Trojans, banking Trojans, and ransomware. xHelper, dubbed Android/Trojan.Dropper.xHelper by Malwarebytes Labs' researchers who discovered it, was initially tagged as a generic Trojan dropper only to be upgraded to the rank of a fully-fledged menace after climbing into the security vendor's top 10 most detected mobile malware in just a few months. Besides a large number of devices, it was found on, xHelper also comes with a number of other peculiarities including the fact that it spreads using DEX (Dalvik Executable) files camouflaged as JAR archives, containing compiled Android application code. This method of infecting new Android devices is quite unique given that most mobile Trojan droppers would use an APK (Android Package) bundled with an infected app, APKs which get subsequently dropped within the Assets folder and then installed and executed on the compromised smartphone or tablet. The encrypted DEX files used by xHelper as part of its infection process are first decrypted and then compiled using the dex2oat compiler tool into an ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) binary which gets executed natively by the device's processor. There's lots more posted on OUR FORUM.

The Dutch data protection agency has asked Microsoft’s lead privacy regulator in Europe to investigate ongoing concerns it has attached to how Windows 10 gathers user data. Back in 2017, the privacy watchdog found Microsoft’s platform to be in breach of local privacy laws on account of how it collects telemetry metadata. After some back and forth with the regulator, Microsoft made changes to how the software operates in April last year — and it was in the course of testing those changes that the Dutch agency found fresh reasons for concern, discovering what it calls in a press release “new, potentially unlawful, instances of personal data processing”. Since the agency’s investigation of Windows 10 started a new privacy framework is being enforced in Europe — the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) — which means Microsoft’s lead EU privacy regulator is the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC), where its regional HQ is based. This is why the Dutch agency has referred to its latest concerns to Ireland. It will now be up to the Irish DPC to investigate Windows 10, adding to its already hefty stack of open files on multiple tech giants’ cross-border data processing activities since the GDPR came into force last May. The regulation steps up the penalties that can be imposed for violations. A spokeswoman for the Irish DPC confirmed to TechCrunch that it received the Dutch agency’s concerns last month. “Since then the DPC has been liaising with the Dutch DPA to further this matter,” she added. “The DPC has had preliminary engagement with Microsoft and, with the assistance of the Dutch authority, we will shortly be engaging further with Microsoft to seek substantive responses on the concerns raised.” Continue reading at OUR FORUM.

Apple released iOS 12.4.1 today to fix a security flaw reintroduced with the release of iOS 12.4 and used by security researcher Pwn20wnd to develop and release a jailbreak tool for up-to-date iOS devices. The vulnerability patched today by Apple is a use after free tracked as CVE-2019-8605 targeted by the Sock Puppet exploit that was used to create jailbreak tools for iOS devices. The flaw was discovered by Google Project Zero's Ned Williamson, was previously patched by Apple with the iOS 12.3 release from May 13, and was now re-patched in iOS 12.4.1. As Apple's support document describing the security content of iOS 12.4.1 says, the flaw could have been abused by malicious applications which then could have been "able to execute arbitrary code with system privileges." The use after free security issue was addressed by Apple with the introduction of improved memory management thus blocking the access of maliciously crafter apps to pointers that have already been freed. Apple acknowledged Google Project Zero's Ned Williamson contribution in finding and fixing this security issue and provided additional recognition for Pwn20wnd's assistance. Besides allowing jailbreak developers to add support for Apple's latest iOS versions, the flaw fixed today by Apple is also a critical vulnerability that can open the doors to attackers targeting the company's large iOS user base. Follow this on OUR FORUM.

Microsoft introduced a new compatibility hold to block users of Zebra XSLATE B10 rugged tablets from installing or updating to Windows 10, version 1903 or Windows 10, version 1809. Redmond was prompted to add this new Windows 10 update block by multiple reports received from XSLATE B10 tablet users stating that the "touch may stop working on the devices after restarting the device." "To safeguard your update experience, we have applied a compatibility hold on these devices from installing or being offered Windows 10, version 1903 or Windows 10, version 1809," says Microsoft. "Upon rebooting the device (warm boot), the issue causes users to lose touch access," states Zebra on its support site. "This issue is currently under investigation by Microsoft. Additional information will be provided on this page as it is received." Redmond's developers are currently working on a resolution for this issue which will be provided to Zebra users with an upcoming release. Until a resolution for these compatibility issues will be offered in a future Windows 10 update, Microsoft advises all users to "not attempt to manually update using the Update now button or the Media Creation Tool until this issue has been resolved." Microsoft is still currently blocking some Windows devices with compatibility issues after receiving the May 2019 Feature Update, in an attempt to prevent users of incompatible computers from experiencing degraded performance after upgrading. Since May 29, Microsoft has resolved the issues behind seven Windows 10 v1903 update blocks 11, with three of them having been removed in a single day, on July 12. More complete details are posted on OUR FORUM.

 

GTranslate