By continuing to use the site or forum, you agree to the use of cookies, find out more by reading our GDPR policy

Microsoft will begin to ship an in-house custom built Linux kernel starting with the Windows 10 Insider builds this summer. This kernel is to become the backbone for the new Windows Subsystem for Linux 2.0 or WSL2. Unlike WSL1, which used a Linux-compatible kernel, WSL2 will use a genuine open-source kernel compiled from the stable 4.19 version release of Linux at Kernel.org. While Microsoft will be providing the Linux kernel, they will not provide any Linux binaries to go with it. Instead, users will still need to download their favorite Linux distribution from the Microsoft Store or by creating a custom distribution package. While the source code for the kernel will come from Kernel.org, Microsoft has stated that they will apply custom patches that reduce the memory footprint of the kernel and provide hardware compatibility. In the first iteration of the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL1), Microsoft had to translate Linux system calls so they could communicate and work with the Windows NT kernel. With the use of a true Linux kernel, it is no longer necessary to use a translation layer and apps will have full access to their normal system calls. Removing the translation layer not only improves compatibility for Linux apps but also increase file system performance. According to tests performed by Microsoft, the new Linux kernel has improved the performance of WSL, with unpacking archives up to 20x faster and tools such as npm, git, and cmake being 2-5x faster. To make it easier to administer WSL2, Microsoft will also include the Linux kernel in Windows Update so that security updates and improvements will automatically be delivered to Windows 10. Learn more by visiting OUR FORUM.

 

GTranslate